Minimum Age for Gorilla Tracking

Minimum age for gorilla tracking / trekking? Mountain Gorilla trekking, is a very amazing activity to encounter for your life time safari.  The trekking of the Mountain Gorillas there is a strict age limit all in the National parks where Mountain Gorillas are inhabited. The Minimum age for gorilla tracking in any on the countries where Gorilla trekking is done is 15 years and above. Passport details are always requested before any Gorilla permit is issued to any person to confirm the date of birth of the guest.

There instances where a child below 15 years may trek

Although Minimum age for gorilla tracking This happens when the child is about to celebrate their 15th birthday. The authorities may extend sympathy to such a child of below 15 years of age.

Another instance is when the child expresses maturity and physical strength to trek the mountain Gorillas.

In case you have such a child contact us in order to make arrangements and book a gorilla permit at the Uganda wildlife Authority. If it’s possible for the child to trek we will surely contact you back.

The Uganda Wildlife Authority has all rights reserved to allow any child or person to trek the Mountain Gorillas.

There a number of reasons why children below the age of 15 years are not allowed to trek. The reasons include the fact that the children have communicable diseases that are easily transmitted to mountain Gorillas which are already endangered.

Children are also unpredictable. It’s hard to tell how they will behave during a Gorilla encounter. Some are very playful and will end up doing what they were refrained from doing. A child who is at least 15 years of age has the maturity and capacity to listen and is less prone to infectious diseases.

In order to avoid all these circumstances, the children below 15 years are not allowed to trek the Mountain Gorillas. Please also note that just in case Uganda Wildlife Authority permits your child to track gorillas, the responsibility is all up to you. They are not in any way responsible for what might happen to your child during the trek.

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